Please Note : Works from the 'Still Moments' exhibition will be shipped from the 14th December

Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)
Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)
Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)
Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)
Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)
Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)
Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)
Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)

Popalini & Jezando Shino Wren Teapot (19)

Maker: Popalini and Jezando

Regular price £184.00

Handmade in UK.

Dimensions: W 9.5 cm x H 9 cm

Materials: Cornish Stoneware, Shino Finish, Iron Handle.

Method:  Wood- fired with Soda

Care Required: hand wash only, Iron handle needs to be dried directly after washing and occasionally rubbish with olive oil.

Capacity: 270ml

 

We recommend pairing this with the Shino Wren Tea Bowls (19).

 

Description:

Popalini & Jezando’s teapots are both fully functional and aesthetically pleasing simultaneously. The Shino finish on this particular form makes it a joy to touch for the user, with it’s smooth and glossy coating and polished brass handle. 

With a 40-hour soda-firing, the soda normally hits the pots on one side, which has the desired effect for artists Popalini & Jezando, who favour working with local and natural materials. Considerately light in colour, this teapot has beautiful grey and orange hues which gradually move from the base towards the lid of the pot.

 

About the Artist: 

Working together under the name Popalini & Jezando, Pop Wilkinson and Jez Anderson make collaboratively designed pots, with a particular focus on teaware. They take influence from the traditional pottery of North Devon, which is where they are both from, and also from the subtle understated forms they admired whilst researching wood-firing in Japan.

The often angular forms of their pots are contrasted with soft tactile elements that together celebrate the materiality of clay while at the same time pairing technical complexity with visual simplicity and function. Within their process Popalini & Jezando exploit elemental methods such as wood-firing and the use of ash glazes and wild clays to imbue their contemporary forms with an ancient, earthy quality.